Is it More Important to Be Popular or Taken Seriously?

I’ve operated this site now for 27 months and despite times of lengthy posting droughts, like earlier this year, or times of daily updates, I’ve managed to produce 225 entries. I think with this experience behind me, I can start to develop trends on what works or doesn’t work when it comes to people reading my articles.

From a statistical point of view, the entries from the first few months are both at an advantage and a disadvantage. They have lived on this site the longest, and have been searchable through Google for the most amount of time and the SEO clock has been ticking the longest. However, when they were posted, there were far less regular followers, which still makes up the core of views. This site gets a decent amount of hits based on what I’ve read for traffic numbers of many bloggers. The place that you don’t see great numbers is often in follows, likes and comments. Without having done any real surveys, I believe this is simply because the website has the words “porn” and “addict” in the title. I think a lot of people would be hesitant to publicly follow a site called “Child Molesters are Bad” despite the fact that we can all agree with that sentiment.

I further believe this phenomenon to be proven when you look at what the most popular postings in two metrics. First, there are the ones that are the popular articles based on “likes”. If you want to see a list of these, just head to the homepage and you’ll find them on the right side of the screen. You should actually do that to understand the rest of this article better.

The other metric to view to determine the most popular articles is based on “hits” which isn’t a public display option on WordPress, yet is the actual number of times an article has been read.

By number of hits, these are the top 10 entries in the history of this site:

  1. The Bond Between Sex Addicts and Those With Eating Disorders
  2. Spotting the Signs of Pornography Addiction
  3. The Day I Went to Jail
  4. Facing Triggers Makes You Stronger
  5. Statistics on and The Definition of Pornography
  6. Q&A: PMO and NoFap as Addiction Cures
  7. Q&A: What Does ‘Gaslighting’ mean?
  8. Practicing Empathy Has Been Huge to Recovery
  9. Mental Health Education, Not Gun Laws, Will Reduce Violence in Our Schools
  10. Q&A: Does Hiding a Porn Addiction Mean He Hid Affairs?

Of these top 10 most-viewed entries, only one, The Day I Went to Jail, makes it onto both most hits and most liked Top 10 lists.

So, considering that any entry has to be in the Top 4% of what I’ve written to make either list, which I think is a large enough sample size, what conclusions can be drawn?

First, I think people do want to read about the ins-and-outs of pornography addiction and want real information. Looking at the hits list, only the jail entry is an experiential piece and only the mental health education one is mainly opinion.

When I look at the most liked list, it’s much different. The top two liked articles both have the words “mental health” in the title and they are both experiential pieces talking about my life. In fact, 8 of the Top 10 most liked articles have the words “Me,” “My,” or “I” in the title. You can even make an argument that the other two are experiential mixed with opinion.

There are certainly other variables. Seven of the top 10 most liked articles have been written in the last three months, and liked by mostly the same people. This could suggest that I just have a following that is more apt to hit the like button at the moment.

Perhaps I’ve also consciously or subconsciously got better at writing click-bait like headlines. I look at the Top 10 most liked articles vs. those that are sitting in the 190s and there’s a big difference in the quality and excitement of headlines. Funny, sensational, cliffhanger-like headlines draw people in. It’s why the news media does it all the time. I mean, let’s be honest, when you read the headline and saw the photo for this post, did you think it was going to be about website data analysis? No, but it got you this far.

I think among those posts that are liked the most, there’s also a level of relatability. Tales of mental health issues, visiting other blogs, frustration with Facebook or loving my dogs are things that you don’t have to be a porn addict to relate with. When readers see themselves in the entries they may be more apt to like them.

I think that a similar correlation can be drawn on the most viewed articles. Clicking that you like those articles may “out” yourself as a porn addict, sex addict, someone with an eating disorder, a partner of a porn addict or somebody else you’re not ready to identify as publicly just yet.

I think another year or two of entries will help to establish whether my hypotheses are correct or if I need to rethink how people approach this website.

This is probably all “inside baseball” to those who don’t have a blog or website, but I’d love to hear from those people who have been blogging for a while. Do you find that there is a wide gulf between the entries that are most read and most liked, or is my experience an outlier?

So…one final experiment I want to try. I need you to “Like” this article. In a month, when views will slow down to a trickle (assuming it’s not one of the most “hit” articles), I can compare how many hits the article got to how many people liked it. In liking it, it shows that you are both supportive of my little experiment and read this far. The difference in # of people who “hit” this entry vs. “like” it should give the number of people who never got this far in the article.

Also, while I have you here, there’s a cool book I want to tell you about… https://amzn.to/2qvxVbm

The banana book is winning again. Help a guy out….

Your Alarming Porn Statistics For July

I’ve mentioned before that one of the amazing ironies of the world of pornography addiction statistics is that the No. 1 porn site in the world, PornHub, actually releases the best statistics of any organization in the world. If you want to know the people’s tastes, duration of use, change from the previous year, etc., this is one smut peddler that deserves a PhD in statistics.

While different tracking sites will share somewhat different stories, It’s safe to say that PornHub is the 5th or 6th most popular site in the United States and around the 13th or 14th most popular site in the world.

If you’re into statistics, I urge you to find a link through a search engine so you don’t end up in parts of the site you’d rather not visit. Some of the statistics have graphic terms, but I believe even those terms can reveal a lot, although I won’t use them here.

You can see some stats meant to freak you out in the picture at the bottom, but these are some of my takeaways from their 2017 statistics:

  • It was a very big year for women throughout the world utilizing pornography on the Internet. Women were 26% of PornHub’s users and in the 20 countries that used the site the most, the percentage of change in female visits was down in only one, Russia. In India, it was up a whopping 129%! Other notable countries where the numbers went up were the USA (10%), UK (15%), Philippines (32%), Japan (56%), Canada (19%) and Spain (19%).
  • The age of somebody using the site follows general Internet usage with 61% under 34 years old. The 55-and-older group makes up 11% with the rest in between. Most countries generally follow the overall trend, but the Netherlands, Sweden and Belgium all show a higher rate of older users while India, The Philippines and South Africa show a higher percentage of young users.
  • Only 24% of PornHub users are accessing the site on a desktop or laptop computer. A whopping 67% are using their smartphones (spread equal between Android and Apple platforms). In India, it’s 86% with smartphones, leading the pack. The remaining 9% worldwide are on tablets.
  • What hurts PornHub’s American viewership numbers? Sports and awards shows. The site saw a 24% decreases in traffic during the Super Bowl between New England and Atlanta, 7% decrease during the Daytona 500, 6% decrease in average traffic during the NBA Finals Game 5 and the American Music Awards, respectively, and a 5% drop during the Academy Awards. The three weekly shows that put a noticeable dent into traffic in America are The Big Bang Theory, The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones.
  • Which single event in 2017 caused the biggest dip in traffic for a one-hour period? The solar eclipse that took place in August. While all 50 states were down, those in the path took the biggest hits, including Wyoming (down 54%), Nebraska (42%), Idaho (40%) and Oregon (39%).
  • Forty-two states have the same most popular search term, lesbian.
  • People from states in the Deep South (Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana) stayed on the longest while states in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Idaho, Washington) had the shortest sessions. The average time spent on the site was 10 minutes, 33 seconds.

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Your Alarming Porn Statistic For June

We all know porn is huge on the Internet, but with all of the percentages and millions of people doing this or that, it’s easy to just let those numbers fly by. I stumbled upon a fascinating website that ranks the popularity of the Top 50 websites in the world.

Based on statistics that came out on May 1 this year, The Top 5 are exactly what you’d expect: Google, Facebook, YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo. Odds are you use one or more of those sites every day.

So what are the next three most popular websites in the United States? Pornhub, Xnxx and XVideos – all sites that deal ONLY in pornography.

That means that there are three porn sites that are individually more popular than Ebay, Twitter, Wikipedia, Reddit or Instagram.

Think about that for a second. All of those people you see taking selfies and posting them to Instagram or who say “I gotta retweet this”… well there are even more people than that at home watching porn, with a decent percentage getting addicted.

Another site, XHamster, ranks at No. 17, just above Netflix. That’s right. There are four sites that stream pornography that are more popular than Netflix.

Four of the Top 20 websites in the world are nothing but pornography. When you see a list of popular websites, and there isn’t any porn on it, know that whoever is presenting it is ignoring the porn and call them out on it. Ignoring the porn is how we got here.